Reading without Subways

I don’t know that I would always have defined myself as a “reader” but in the past five years, it is quickly becoming one of the hats I wear and love. When people ask me my hobbies, reading is the first one I mention. My husband teases me that in my ideal future, I would be very content as an 80 year old woman who just rides the New York subway and reads books all day. He is not wrong.

Books and reading are one way I remember I’m an adult with a brain. Sometimes after the 89th reenactment of Fireman Sam saving the day or the 3rd poopy diaper, I forget that I like to think and like to learn. I get frustrated and feel a little trapped. Reading is my favorite way of learning. On a side note, Bill Gates agrees with me.

So, since I last posted about books, I have read another mystery series- The Gaslight Mysteries based in turn of the century New York City with a great female protagonist, Sarah Brandt. They are not too dark and not too challenging, which is good for someone who is just trying to get through morning sickness and pregnancy insomnia.

But I’ve also read some other books, four in particular that I loved. No two of which are alike, which may have added to my enjoyment of them.

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson was recommended by a few friends and John Grisham (in a magazine article). I was so moved by the book that I gave it to all my family members for Christmas. This is an important book that looks at our criminal justice system, how it disadvantages entire communities and the very hard work that a small group of people are doing to change it. I wept at night while reading it and despite the tough topic, found myself hopeful at the end of it, as well as convicted about what I can do to help. I truly believe everyone should read this book.

The Tears of Dark Water by Corban Addison was another favorite. I always love his books- A Walk Across the Sun brought the issue of human trafficking to my attention and The Tears of Dark Water was similar. I could not put this book down and it made me look at the plot from lots of different perspectives. Detailed, compelling and beautiful, I was transported to a land halfway around the world that is radically different from where I live.

Girl Waits with Gun by Amy Stewart was recommended by the NPR Book Concierge, an app I plan to use more often. I loved this story of Constance Kopp and her sisters, women who did not fit the mold in 1914, who rather than running and hiding from trouble face it head on. Each of the characters made me laugh and I found myself smiling at their antics and impressed with their courage.

And lastly, if there were such a thing as a reading hero, mine would be Kristen Robbins Warren, my former roommate and all-star middle school teacher in Brooklyn. I read her blog, A Kind of Library, regularly and love her reviews and recommendations. Recently, she recommended Hunting and Gathering by Anna Galvada, a French novel, translated into English (I’m not quite that good at French yet) about two lonely characters who find one another and gather a group of misfits to create their own place of belonging and home. The language is beautiful and I had a lot of fun recognizing many of the cultural references and general attitudes. The book is, as Kristin says, a micro-issue book, looking at how we find one another, connect with one another and create belonging.

Read them. Love them. Hate them. Let me know.

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One thought on “Reading without Subways

  1. I am so impressed and pleased that you can read and retain such quantities of literature while being a great mom to two and a fraction of children.

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